Bookish Tattoos: Fight Club

Bookish Tattoos is a meme that is inspired by a column at Rhymes With Geek. We’ll look at tattoos inspired by books! If you have a bookish tattoo and you’d like to be featured please send me a picture at Email Me (maibyers(@)gmail(dot)com) Until I get your submissions, I’ll just scour the internet!

Found at: The Cult

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

The first rule about fight club is you don’t talk about fight club.

In his debut novel, Chuck Palahniuk showed himself to be his generation’s most visionary satirist. Fight Club’s estranged narrator leaves his lackluster job when he comes under the thrall of Tyler Durden, an enigmatic young man who holds secret boxing matches in the basement of bars. There two men fight “as long as they have to.” A gloriously original work that exposes what is at the core of our modern world.

Add to Goodreads

Fight Club is one of the most quotable books of all time. It only seems fitting that people would get tons of quote tattoos about it. Actually I’m pretty surprised I don’t have one. But my favorite line in the book is a little ridiculous: “I want to have your abortion.” Yeah. Not getting that tattooed on me. Before I get any hate, it’s my favorite line for two reasons. One, it’s super ridiculous and made me laugh when I read it. Two, in the movie that was the original line but it got changed to “I haven’t been f***ed like that since grade school.” And the person who had the line changed in the first place wanted the original line back but it was a deal so it couldn’t be done.

Makes me wonder if anyone has a Choke tattoo. That might be gross…

Advertisements

Bookish Tattoos: Clockwork Orange

Bookish Tattoos is a meme that is inspired by a column at Rhymes With Geek. We’ll look at tattoos inspired by books! If you have a bookish tattoo and you’d like to be featured please send me a picture at Email Me Until I get your submissions, I’ll just scour the internet!

Found at: Clockwork Orange Tumblr

Inspired By: A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

A vicious fifteen-year-old “droog” is the central character of this 1963 classic, whose stark terror was captured in Stanley Kubrick’s magnificent film of the same title.

In Anthony Burgess’s nightmare vision of the future, where criminals take over after dark, the story is told by the central character, Alex, who talks in a brutal invented slang that brilliantly renders his and his friends’ social pathology. A Clockwork Orange is a frightening fable about good and evil, and the meaning of human freedom. When the state undertakes to reform Alex—to “redeem” him—the novel asks, “At what cost?”

A Clockwork Orange is my favorite and most hated book. I too will someday sport a Anthony Burgess inspired tattoo. But mine will be a mechanical orange in the middle of words that say “Horror Show.”

Bookish Tattoos: Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

Bookish Tattoos is a meme that is inspired by a column at Rhymes With Geek. We’ll look at tattoos inspired by books! If you have a bookish tattoo and you’d like to be featured please send me a picture at Email Me Until I get your submissions, I’ll just scour the internet!

 


Found at: Haruki Murakami Fan Blog

Inspired By: The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami & Jay Rubin (Translator)
Japan’s most highly regarded novelist now vaults into the first ranks of international fiction writers with this heroically imaginative novel, which is at once a detective story, an account of a disintegrating marriage, and an excavation of the buried secrets of World War II.

In a Tokyo suburb a young man named Toru Okada searches for his wife’s missing cat. Soon he finds himself looking for his wife as well in a netherworld that lies beneath the placid surface of Tokyo. As these searches intersect, Okada encounters a bizarre group of allies and antagonists: a psychic prostitute; a malevolent yet mediagenic politician; a cheerfully morbid sixteen-year-old-girl; and an aging war veteran who has been permanently changed by the hideous things he witnessed during Japan’s forgotten campaign in Manchuria.

Gripping, prophetic, suffused with comedy and menace, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle is a tour de force equal in scope to the masterpieces of Mishima and Pynchon.

Three books in one volume: The Thieving Magpie, Bird as Prophet, The Birdcatcher. This translation by Jay Rubin is in collaboration with the author.

Add To Goodreads